15 things I learned as a first year teacher

I'm so excited to post my second guest post, also from a former student turned teacher.  Elizabeth Kueng has sage advice from a first year teacher's perspective.  These are great reminders for novice and veteran teachers and everyone in between.   I didn’t always think I wanted to be a teacher. I actually was opposed... Continue Reading →

Mindfulness in the Classroom

I am so excited to celebrate my one-year blogging milestone by sharing my first guest post from Lauren Payne Bunn. What makes this even more special is that Lauren was a former student of mine. My former students who become teachers hold a special place in my heart. She writes about an important topic as... Continue Reading →

Beware the IDES of March

March is an extremely long month for teachers. It does not come with the welcome break of Presidents’ Day, and if Easter falls in April, as it does this year, March is the month that many just have to literally march through putting one foot in front of the other. One of the best things... Continue Reading →

Hosting an African American Read In

We hosted our first African American Read In this year inspired by the National Council of Teachers of English Black Caucus. Ingredients: 1 part--Enthusiastic students with a renewed love for reading gained through choice and time in class to read. 1 part--An excellent librarian willing to do just about anything to foster student engagement in... Continue Reading →

Rethinking the Research Paper

Writing a literary research paper is a required component in the dual-enrollment class that I teach. Many things about this paper are unchangeable: the length, the MLA format, and the fact that I have to evaluate all of them. In order to make this process more enjoyable for all parties involved, I decided to rethink... Continue Reading →

Blogging benefits student voice

This year my class is blogging on an Edublogs site at adriannester.edublogs.org.  The inspiration for starting these blogs has several main purposes. Students should be writing more than any teacher can read. To paraphrase Kelly Gallager, not every paper that a student writes needs to be proofed, edited, graded, and scored by the teacher.  Grade certain... Continue Reading →

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